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Current Course Offerings


 
For a complete list of course offerings see the Degree Plans found in current and previous catalog's.

BIO-103 | Principles of Biology | 4 credits
Biology is the study of the structure and function of living cells with special consideration of the role of membranes and enzymes in cell functioning. Emphasis is placed on the central role of DNA in directing the construction and functioning of cells. Study of the energy-transforming processes of photosynthesis and respiration and how these processes "provide" the energetic force necessary for the continued functioning of living systems - from cells to ecosystems is considered. Cell reproduction, DNA replication, chromosome separation during meiosis and the resultant predictable (and sometimes unexpected) patterns of inheritance are introduced. The relationship between genetic variation and evolution; the origin of life and the way in which subsequent evolution has given rise to the vast diversity of organisms which currently inhabit this planet are studied. Note: Either BIO 103 or BIO 106, but not both, may be taken to fulfill the basic science requirement. Either may be followed by a second biology course. Lecture and laboratory.

BIO-106 | Introduction to the Life Science | 4 credits
Life Science is the study of the structure and function of biological entities ranging from single cells through multi-cellular organisms to entire ecosystems. During part of the course, emphasis is placed on mankind's role in causing and solving environmental and ecological problems. Emphasis shifts to cellular structure and processes such as respiration, photosynthesis and cell division. During the latter third of the course focus is on structures and functions of the human body. This course is designed primarily for the non-science major and may not be used toward the biology major. Lecture and laboratory.

BIO-107 | Introduction to Life Science II | 4 credits
This course is best suited for students who have chosen a non-science major. Included in this segment of Life Science are the subjects of nonliving infectious agents, taxonomy, the six kingdoms of living organisms, evolution and genetics. Lecture and laboratory.

BIO-202 | Medical Terminology | 2 credits
This course focuses on the study of basic medical terminology. Prefixes, suffixes, word roots, combining forms, special endings, plural forms, abbreviations and symbols are included in the content. A word-building system that provides the opportunity to decipher unfamiliar terms will be utilized. Emphasis is placed on spelling, definition and usage.

BIO-203 | Human Physiology & Anatomy I | 4 credits
This course offers the study of organization in living human systems. The underlying theme is homeostasis. Study includes bone structure, sensory physiology, coordination by the autonomic and voluntary nervous systems, the physiology of muscle contraction and the response of the organism to environmental variation. Laboratory includes dissection, gross and histological studies of the skeletal, nervous and muscular systems as well as physiological experimentation. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-103 and two semesters of chemistry

BIO-204 | Human Physiology & Anatomy II | 4 credits
This course offers the study of organization in living human systems. The underlying theme is the concept of homeostasis and feedback mechanisms within the organism which sustains it. Study includes coordination by hormones from endocrine glands, nutrition, digestion, respiration, transport of respiratory gases, circulation, water balance, electrolyte balance, excretion and reproduction. Laboratory includes dissection, gross and histological studies as well as physiological experimentation. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-203

BIO-221 | Introductory Microbiology | 4 credits
This course covers issues germane to a nursing career: pathogenesis, identification, epidemiology. Students will review and examine the morphology, physiology and control of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Classroom topics will include: taxonomy and identification, metabolism and genetics, pathogenesis and immune response, antimicrobials and epidemiology. Laboratory work will focus on sterile technique and microbial identification methodologies based on morphology and physiology. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-103 and CHM-101 or CHM-111 and concurrent registration in CHM-102 or CHM-112

BIO-240 | Botany | 4 credits
Botany is the study of organization and function in plants from the cellular to the whole-plant level. Topics emphasized include photosynthesis, plant phylogeny, plant reproduction, nutrient uptake and translocation, hormonal and environmental control of plant development and mankind's dependence on plants and plant products. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-103 or HRT-100

BIO-241 | Zoology | 4 credits
Zoology is the study of animal life, from single-celled to complex, multicellular creatures. Students are introduced to the different phyla of multicellular animals with a focus on comparing structural, functional, reproductive, life history, and ecological differences in an evolutionary context. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-103

BIO-290 | Introduction to Research | 1 credit
The first course of a three-course sequence (290/390/490) is designed to prepare students for independent research and to support students for successful undergraduate research. The general goal of the course is to acquaint students with an introduction to scientific research and point them to the opportunities available.
Prerequisite: Take one course in biology

BIO-298 | Early Research Experience | 1 credit
This one-credit elective course, aiming to provide a platform for students who do not meet the prerequisite of CHM/BIO 498 (i.e. a more advanced independent research course) to engage in early research experience. This course requires an investigation of a hypothesis based topic. The research work is selected and carried out under the direction of the instructor. It involves a literature review of the area of endeavor, establishment of hypothesis, experiment design to test the hypothesis, data collection and result analysis. A research summary is required as the product of the research experience.

BIO-302 | Immunology | 4 credits
This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of immunology. Topics include immunoglobulin structure and function, cellular and molecular immunology, types of immune reactions and immunological disorders. Emphasis is placed on how the immune system protects individuals against infectious agents and prevents the development of abnormal cells within the body. Lecture and laboratory. Recommended: BIO-203 and BIO-320
Prerequisite: Take BIO-103

BIO-310 | Ecology | 4 credits
Ecology is an examination of ecological principles that pertain to terrestrial populations, communities, ecosystems, biomes and the biosphere. A central focus of this course is on the interactions between organisms and between organisms and the non-living environment, and how such interactions manifest themselves in ecosystem patterns and processes. Laboratory and field work include vegetation sampling, study of species diversity in a variety of habitats and analysis of prairie and forest ecosystems. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-240, BIO-241 and BIO-320

BIO-320 | Microbiology | 4 credits
Microbiology is the study of morphology, physiology and systematics of bacteria with a special emphasis on biochemical reactions which serve as a basis for bacterial identification. Included in the course is a brief survey of yeasts, molds, viruses and rickettsiae. Consideration is given to microorganisms in their relationship to disease, i.e., infection, antibiotics and immunity; as well as their relationship to soil and water. Identification of unknown bacteria and an independent project are carried out by each student. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-103 and one year of chemistry

BIO-330 | Genetics | 4 credits
This course offers an introduction to the principles of classical Mendelian genetics and the principles and techniques of modern molecular genetics. Topics to be covered include Mendel's laws, gene linkage, genetic recombination and chromosome mapping, followed by a study of the chemistry of DNA and the molecular mechanics of transcription, translation, replication controls on gene expression and modern manipulation of DNA. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-103 and one year of chemistry

BIO-360 | Vertebrate Embryology | 4 credits
The study of gametogenesis, fertilization, differentiation, organogenesis and system development is covered in this course. Laboratory activities include preparation of histological sections, physiological and morphological study of live embryos of frog and chick and a study of serial sections of the frog, chick and pig. An independent laboratory project is carried out by each student. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-204 and one year of chemistry

BIO-364 | Cell and Molecular Biology | 4 credits
This course involves the study of topics in protein biology and biochemistry, including protein structure, function, isolation, molecular evolution and the detection and molecular basis of disease. Emphasized are the organization and complexity of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular infrastructure, genomes, gene function and regulation and the structure of the eukaryotic chromosome. Knowledge of molecular techniques will be developed throughout the course. Techniques include electrophoresis, affinity chromatography, peptide mapping, enzyme cytochemistry, western blot, southern blot, nucleic acid analysis, and bioinformatics. The laboratory component emphasizes genomic and proteomic interpretation and bioinformatics. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-103 and CHM-112

BIO-370 | Histology | 4 credits
Histology is the study of microscopic structure in mammalian tissues and organs. Emphasis is placed on functional relationships of structures. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-204

BIO-390 | Junior Seminar | 1 credit
This second course of a three-course sequence (290/390/490) is designed to prepare students for independent research, the presentation requirements for most summer research experiences and to support students for successful undergraduate research. The general goal of the course is to acquaint students with scientific literature, identifying key components of a scientific paper and the mechanics of developing and presenting a scientific poster.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-290 and 2 courses in Biology

BIO-490 | Seminar | 1 credit
This final course in a three-course sequence (290/390/490) is designed to give the student an opportunity to carry out a careful review of the literature on a topic of his or her choice, to write an abstract and paper on that topic and to present the information in an oral report to the natural science faculty and students.
Prerequisite: Take BIO-390 and 4 courses in Biology

BIO-498 | Research | 1 to 4 credits
This course requires an investigation (on or off campus) of a hypothesis concerning a biological topic. The work is selected and carried out under the direction of a biology faculty member. It involves a literature review of the area of the endeavor and selected laboratory experiments designed to test the hypothesis. Results may be presented to the Collegiate Section of the South Dakota Academy of Science, the Colleges of Mid-America Conference and/or other regional or national scientific meetings.
Prerequisite: Take 4 courses in Biology